What happens after Year 11?

You should stay in some kind of education, training, or go to work until the end of the academic year you turn 18.

What are my options?

  • stay on at school in sixth form
  • study at a further education college or training provider
  • do an apprenticeship

Try to do some research about the subjects you are interested in and visit the school or college first. You also need to check if they have any requirements (such as Maths and English GCSE) for entry. For some A levels you may need to achieve required grades at GCSE in the same subject.

The resources below will help you to understand what this means for you. You can also ask your school or university technical college (UTC) for help.

​Resource​Details
​Applying for a sixth-form place
​To find out about applying for a place in sixth form, contact the school directly or visit the school's website for further details of their admission arrangements and how to apply.
Prospects​ The careers service for young people in Northamptonshire, helping young people with their career ideas and the next steps after GCSEs and post 16 education.
Find an apprenticeship or traineeship vacancy​Search for new vacancies in traditional and non-traditional sectors, both in Northamptonshire and elsewhere.
UCAS database​Find lots more advice on what to do after year 11.
National Careers Service​Plan your career, look for courses or get help finding a job.
​Find out about college courses at:
​To apply for a course at one of these colleges, please visit the relevant college's website.

16-19 bursary

You could get a bursary to help with education-related costs if you’re aged 16 to 19 and:

  • studying at school or college (not university) in England
  • on a training course, including traineeships

Further education colleges can have a different atmosphere to schools, and you may need to succeed in the first year or initial qualification to be able to move on to the next level.

What if I have a disability or special educational need?

If you have a disability or special educational needs, talk to your school or college as you may be able to get extra support to help you study and pass your exams. You can find more information on the education health and care plans webpage and the Local Offer site (this includes specialist post-16 institutions).

The Preparing for Adulthood site has support links for young people aged 14-18 who require specialist support.

Options outside of school or college

  • find a part-time job
  • volunteer
  • start your own business

Any experience on top of what you learn at school will help with your personal development and could help you to get the job you want in the future.

Where can I find more help?

How to deal with exam stress

Watch the video for advice and tips on revision and how to ace your exams.

 

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