Test your smoke alarm when you change your clocks this weekend

20 October 2014

Northamptonshire Fire and Rescue Service is urging people to test their smoke alarm when they put their clocks back an hour this weekend.

Last year, more than half of the 213 fire deaths in the home were caused by smoke inhalation and in the majority of fatal domestic fires, smoke alarms were either absent or did not go off – and a common cause was missing or flat batteries.

That’s why the Fire Kills campaign, run in partnership with Northamptonshire Fire and Rescue Service, is encouraging people to make an online pledge to test their smoke alarms this clock change weekend (25-26 October).

Why is it important to test your smoke alarm?

Baz Fox, Prevention and Community Protection Manager for Northamptonshire Fire and Rescue Service, said: “Smoke alarms are a well-proven life-saving tool, but they are no use if they are not working.

“You are at least four times more likely to die in a fire if you don’t have a working smoke alarm, so taking the time to test the smoke alarms in your home could be a truly life-saving decision.”

In March 2014, nearly one in seven people tested their smoke alarms when they changed their clocks to British Summer Time.

This autumn, Northamptonshire Fire and Rescue Service and the Fire Kills campaign is inviting people to take the Tick Tock Test pledge by signing up on the Fire Kills Facebook page or clicking on special Tick Tock Test adverts when they see them online and on their mobile phones.

Could you help a family member or neighbour?

Over half the people who died in fires in the home last year were aged 65 or over, so as well as testing their own smoke alarms, people are being asked to help others who may need some assistance.

The new Fire Kills campaign focuses on the deadly effects of smoke. Many people believe smoke will wake them up if fire breaks out, but it won’t. A working smoke alarm is the most effective way to alert you to the danger.

To find out more visit www.facebook.com/firekills or www.gov.uk/firekills.


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